RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM ON COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE/DATA SCIENCES – Ben Klemens – Using administrative records to reveal disparate outcomes from U.S. domestic migration

When:
January 24, 2020 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
2020-01-24T15:00:00-05:00
2020-01-24T16:00:00-05:00
Where:
CENTER FOR SOCIAL COMPLEXITY SUITE, 3RD FLOOR, RESEARCH HALL
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Karen Underwood
7039939298

Research Colloquium on Computational Social Science/Data Science

Ben Klemens PhD
U.S. Treasury Department

Using administrative records to reveal disparate outcomes from U.S. domestic migration

Friday, January 24, 3:00 p.m.
Center for Social Complexity Suite, 3rd Floor Research Hall

All are welcome to attend.

Abstract:
Economic models of migration, domestic and international, typically begin with the assumption that a moving household’s primary goal is to attain higher income than it would earn by staying.  This article uses administrative records for almost all people earning formal market income in the U.S., 2001–2015, totaling about 1.7 billion household observations with 82 million long-distance moves, to develop a detailed match between movers and comparable stayers and thus a comparison of movers’ income changes relative to stayers.  This talk will focus on the technical issues of dealing with a billion-scale data set, and the methodological opportunities it affords.  The matching method shows that for almost all subgroups, pecuniary benefits are not large, and they are not evenly distributed.  Movers leaving school and most younger households likely to see higher income relative to staying, but other movers, most notably single parents, are roughly half as likely to see a relative income gain.
Bio:
Ben Klemens is an economist and statistician at the United States Treasury. He has written on modeling methodology and intellectual property policy, including a book on statistical computing from Princeton University press and one on software patents from Brookings Press. He also developed an innovative library of statistics functions for C, named Apophenia.