COMPUTATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM /COLLOQUIUM IN COMPUTATIONAL AND DATA SCIENCES – Garbage Cans, Lymph Nodes and Cybersecurity: Modeling Organizational Effectiveness – Douglas A. Samuelson and Russell R. Vane III

When:
February 22, 2019 @ 3:00 pm
2019-02-22T15:00:00-05:00
2019-02-22T15:15:00-05:00
Where:
CENTER FOR SOCIAL COMPLEXITY SUITE, 3RD FLOOR, RESEARCH HALL
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Karen Underwood
7039939298

Computational Social Science Research Colloquium /
Colloquium in Computational and Data Sciences

Douglas A. Samuelson
D.Sc., President and Chief Scientist, InfoLogix, Inc.
and
Russell R. Vane III
Future Planner, National Risk Management Center
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency
US Department of Homeland Security

Garbage Cans, Lymph Nodes and Cybersecurity: Modeling Organizational Effectiveness

Friday, February 22, 3:00 p.m.
Center for Social Complexity Suite, 3rd Floor Research Hall

All are welcome to attend.

Abstract:

We re-examine and extend the well-known “Garbage Can Model” of Cohen, March and Olsen (1972).  They postulated that organizational choice can be well represented by a garbage can into which problems and solutions are thrown randomly.  When, by random mixing, a solution meets a problem, the problem is solved and removed from the venue.  In 2006, Folcik and Orosz presented an agent-based model of a lymph node, into which blood cells bring foreign substances and objects that are then neutralized by specialized immune system cells.  This model led several social scientists, notably Troitzsch (2008), to point out a strong resemblance to the garbage can model, but now adding the recognition that problems require skill sets which some, but not all, solvers possess.  Matching skill sets is critical to effective performance, and providing the right mix of solver skill sets enables the organization to perform effectively and economically.  We suggest ways to apply this approach to integrated man-machine systems intended to enhance information systems security.  One implication is that some approaches currently popular with policy-makers are highly unlikely to work.